Trouble Shooting

No signal (Star and Entertainment Plans)

Snowy, blue or black screen (Star & Entertainment Plans)

Cannot change channels using the number key pad (Star Plans)

Time does not display on the set-top box (Star Plans)

Remote will not run the set-top box (Star & Entertainment Plans)

Red light on the set-top box or will show an envelope (Star Plans)

Standard Definition Television vs. High-Definition Television

HDMI vs. Component Cable

Why do I have black bars on my HDTV screen?

How do I get rid of the bars?

No Signal (Star & Entertainment Plans)

  • Verify the VCR/DVD players are off.
  • Verify TV is on channel 3.
  • Verify set-top box is powered on.

Snowy, Blue or Black Screen (Star & Entertainment Plans)

  • Is there power to your TV?
  • Check to be sure the set-top box is powered on.
  • Verify TV is on channel 3 or correct input.
  • Check the cable connections – should be tight.
  • Check to see if other TVs are out.
  • Unplug the set-top box for 5 minutes. Plug the set-top box back in and turn the power back on.

Cannot change channels using the number key pad (Star Plans)

  • Hit the Menu button twice.
  • Scroll down the second page and select Setup
  • Click OK
  • Highlight Guide Setup
  • Click OK
  • Highlight No Auto Tune (3rd option down on the right)
  • Click the left arrow – it will change to Auto tune
  • Click OK

Time does not display on the set-top box (Star Plans)

  • Hit the Menu button twice.
  • Scroll down the second page and select Setup
  • Click OK
  • Highlight set-top box Set-up
  • Click OK
  • Highlight current channel
  • Click the left arrow – it will change to current time
  • Click OK

Remote will not run the set-top box (Star & Entertainment Plans)

  • Press the CBL mode button
  • Replace the batteries with two new AA batteries.
  • Contact Arvig Repair at 866-937-4227 to help you program your remote.

Red light on the set-top box or will show an envelope (Star Plans)

  • Hit Menu twice
  • Highlight Messages (2nd column)
  • Click OK
  • Click OK on the message
  • To delete – highlight the red X at the bottom on the screen
  • Click OK

Standard Definition Television (SDTV) vs. High Definition Television (HDTV)

High Definition Television provides a much clearer picture than Standard Definition. HDTV also has the benefit of a wide-screen feature. Wide screen provides a full view of the scenes on the television program you are watching without cutting out any background features or side views.

 

  • Aspect ratio – Standard television has a 4:3 aspect ratio — it is four units wide by three units high. HDTV has a 16:9 aspect ratio, more like a movie screen.
  • Resolution – The lowest standard resolution (SDTV) will be about the same as analog TV and will go up to 704 x 480 pixels. The highest HDTV resolution is 1920 x 1080 pixels. HDTV can display about ten times as many pixels as an analog TV set.
  • Frame rate – A set’s frame rate describes how many times it creates a complete picture on the screen every second. DTV frame rates usually end in “i” or “p” to denote whether they are interlaced or progressive. DTV frame rates range from 24p (24 frames per second, progressive) to 60p (60 frames per second, progressive).

 

High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) vs. Component Cable

Component Basics

Type of Signal: Analog Connection

Number of Cables: Five

Three for separate color channels and two for left and right audio channels.

Resolution: Capable of displaying video content up to 1080i, which is 1920-by-1080 pixels on your screen. Supports 720p resolutions and 1080i

HDMI Basics

Type of Signal: Digital
Displays signals on a flat-panel TV with less conversion, which, in theory, creates a slightly better signal.

Number of Cables: 1
Has both digital video and surround sound audio in only 1 cable

Resolution: Supports 1080p resolutions which is something component cannot do. So if you’re planning on viewing 1080p content, HDMI will be the best option for you. For 720p and 1080i resolutions, you should try both and see which looks the best to you.

So, which is better, HDMI or component?
The answer… it depends. It depends upon your source and display devices, and there’s no good way to say in advance whether the digital or the analog connection will provide a better picture. You may even find that your DVD player looks better through its HDMI output, while your satellite or cable box looks better through its component output, on the same display. In this case, there’s no real substitute for simply plugging it in and giving it a try both ways.

Why do I have black bars on my HDTV screen?

The original television tubes were round and it would have been very difficult to be able to show a wide-screen format on them. Square would have been the best as far as the tube goes, but studies have shown that when we humans watch a square for any length of time we get very tired. That’s why the 4:3 format was adopted by the movies prior to the 1950s and TV manufacturers decided to use the same aspect ratio. Flash forward a few decades when HDTV is introduced. In addition to greatly improving the picture, televisions went to a ratio of 16:9 (widescreen) to emulate the movie experience. Obviously, if you take a 4:3 SD picture and try to show it on a 16:9 widescreen, it will not fit. Enter pillar boxes, or vertical bars on the left and right of the screen.

How Do I Get Rid Of The Bars?

Some people may prefer to not see the bars on their TV. To accommodate this need the TV manufacturers have incorporated various modes to manipulate the picture to fill the screen. The electronics to manipulate the video was developed before the HDTV even existed for the early SD widescreen TVs that were for viewing widescreen DVDs, so they will only manipulate SD video. Only a very few HDTVs have any ability to manipulate HD video..

Your TV will have different aspect ratio settings you can choose from.